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MJ’s hair as diamond: Who has right?

 

 

 

Global celebrity Michael Jackson is a person who is famously recognized by society. Celebrities are recognized especially by the common people of the society.

Without the recognition of common mass, Michael Jackson can’t be called celebrity. So admires of MJ have first and last right of his parts of the body including his burnt hair.

 

 

Human desire to discuss celebrities

Generally speaking, in the eyes of common viewers a celebrity is also someone who seeks media attention and most frequently has an extroverted personality. Nathanael Fast of Stanford University in California, people need something to talk about. The human desire to find common ground in conversation pushes us to discuss already popular people, he says.

Common mass of the fans of Michael Jackson has also right on his burnt hairs which are being turned into diamond after the death of MJ by the Chicago based company. 

 

So diamond can be made from the burnt hair of MJ. But the dollars obtained by the selling of these diamonds should be utilized for the benefit of his admires means common people by whom Michael Jackson can be called global celebrity.

 

Hair Stylist for Michael Jackson

The most recent hair stylist that tops the charts for working with Michael, would be Clyde Haygood. Clyde, was the head hair stylist for Michael’s, “This Is It” tour. From his interview with Access Hollywood, he wasresponsible for making sure the hair styles of the entire cast, reflected Michael’s vision for the film footage as well as the productions.

 

The filmy style incident of MJ’s hair burning

Since Michael Jackson's sudden death on June 25, the rumor mill over details of his bizarre personal life has ground away nearly non-stop, and on July 24, Chicago based Jewellery company Life Gem claims that it can convert the strands of hair into pieces of gem.

The story starts with Jackson's flammable 1984 Pepsi commercial. As anyone who's seen the footage knows, the spot's executive producer, Ralph Cohen, threw his Armani jacket over Jackson's head to help smother the flames.

But after aiding his pal, Cohen gathered up some of Jackson's charred tresses. After going on the auction block, the hair eventually wound up in the hands of a collector, who has teamed with a company called LifeGem to sell "diamonds" made from the fried follicles. www.newsanalysisindia.com/.../Solar-Eclipse-July22-Diamond-Ring.aspx

 

"Absolutely this is for real," News.com.au quoted Dean of the company Vanden Biesen as saying: In fact he estimates that they can make close to 10 diamonds out of the late singers burnt hair.

Vanden  Biesen told Reuters he thought the company could make about 10 diamonds. No sale price has been set but Vanden Biesen said Life Gem created three diamonds from locks of Beethoven's hair in 2007, and sold one of them for around $200,000.

 

The above burning incident of 1984 related to celebrity MJ reminds us another burning incident of 1989 in the Premier Studios of Mysore (INDIA) related to Indian Bolly wood celebrity Sanjay Khan. Due to that massive fire final death toll was reached to 62. Sanjay Khan himself suffered major burns and had to spend 13 months in hospital and undergo 72 surgeries.

 

Clive James, the Australian writer, broadcaster and performer, wrote in his book and argues achieving great fame requires frequent self reinvention, as exhibited by Michael Jackson, Madonna and the more recent Rihanna. Death does not necessarily end fame; in fact the opposite may happen, as in the cases of certain luminaries of the stage and in music, such as American singer Elvis Presley, actress Marilyn Monroe, rapper & actor Tupac Shakur, and Jackson himself. 

 

 

Rise of international celebrities in acting and popular music

A global celebrity is someone who is known by most people of the world. Michael Jackson is a global celebrity. The rise of international celebrities in acting and popular music is due in large part to the massive scope and scale of the media industries, enabling celebrities to be viewed more often and in more places.

 

Marketing/auctioning of hair is not new

Bits of Che Guevara, the Argentinian revolutionary and student-fave are also worth a bit if you can get your hands on them. A lock of his hair, which had been cut from his dead body by CIA agents in Bolivia, sold for $100,000 (£60k) in Dallas last year.

Britney's hair 'on sale for $1m'

As reported by BBC, the US hair salon where pop star Britney Spears shaved her head has apparently set up a website to auction her locks for more than $1m (£512,500).

You may go through the site thebeautybrains.com. There you find Heart Diamond (or Heart-in-Diamon.com/

This company as http://www.LifeGem.com/  uses pressure and temperature conditions to turn carbon from human hair or cremation ashes (?!) into what they say are certified (though man-made) diamonds.

“Recently, a woman in Austin, Texas had a diamond made from her father’s remains,” Jared Parrish, director of sales and marketing for Algordanza, says. “The diamond was set in her engagement ring so her father could still walk with her down the aisle.”

 

Analysis by Premendra Agrawal

 

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